top of page
  • Writer's pictureJudith Barry Studio

Judith Barry in Style Congo: Heritage and Heresy

Updated: Aug 18, 2023

CIVA Brussels Belgium


Judith Barry exhibited work: The Work of the Forest Installation: 3-channel video-sound projection panorama with Art Nouveau screen Dimensions: variable First exhibited: Foundation pour l’architecture, Brussels 1992 Exhibition: Style Congo: Heritage and Heresy

Museum: Architecture, Landscape, Urban Planning BRUSSELS - CIVA

Place: Brussels, Belgium

March 17—September 3, 2023

Installation view: The Work of the Forest, Berardo Museum, in Lisbon, Portugal, 2010
Installation view: The Work of the Forest, Berardo Museum, in Lisbon, Portugal, 2010

The exhibition, Style Congo: Heritage and Heresy, explores the politics of cultural representation and appropriation through contemporary artistic and architectural interventions as well as historic documents and materials from the CIVA's Collections. The exhibition visually chronicles the representation of Congo in international expositions held between 1885 and 1958, using Art Nouveau as its anchor point. The movement—at the time also called "Style Congo"—coincided with King Leopold II's exploitation of the Congo and reflects a widespread fascination with “exotic” materials and forms.


Installation view: The Work of the Forest, CIVA, Brussels, 2023
Installation view: The Work of the Forest, CIVA, Brussels, 2023

The works in the exhibition question and destabilize canonical histories and the colonial roots of this heritage. By examining marks of colonization in the city of Brussels and in the Congolese urban landscape, they present a de-colonial resignification of private and public spaces, seeking to rewrite the margins of history into the center.

In 1989 Judith Barry was invited to make an intervention into an exhibition about Art Nouveau architecture in Brussels focusing on the Belgian Art Nouveau architects Victor Horta and Paul Hankar, among others.

Barry's research uncovered discrepancies between official histories of Art Nouveau and African Art and what actually occurred.


Installation view: The Work of the Forest, CIVA, Brussels, 2023
Installation view: The Work of the Forest, CIVA, Brussels, 2023

By examining African objects on view in the Tervuren Museum, formerly the Royal Museum of Congo, it became obvious that the Art Nouveau forms developed by Horta, Hankar and others had their genesis as much in the curvilinear carved forms of collected Congo artifacts as through a celebration of the Arts and Crafts movement. By 1895 there were more than 2000 objects housed in the Stanley Archives at the Royal Museum of Congo.

Additionally, a truism of US/European art history is that Picasso 'discovered' African Art when he had a revelation while viewing African art at the ethnographic museum at the Palais du Trocadéro in 1907.

By the 1880's there were several popular books and feuilletons about Congo, including photos and drawings, of some of these artifacts, alongside tales of the 'heroic' exploits by some of the ‘explorers’ ... Meanwhile Leopold II's project, The Congo Free State Propaganda War, was a worldwide media propaganda campaign waged by both King Leopold II of Belgium and the critics of the Congo Free State and its atrocities. Hence, African Art and its bloody history were well – known before the Congo Exposition of 1897.


Installation view: The Work of the Forest, CIVA, Brussels, 2023
Installation view: The Work of the Forest, Foundation pour l’Architecture, Brussels, 1992
 

Installation: 3-channel video / sound panorama on wooden screens, 1992 First exhibited, La Fondation pour l'Architecture à Bruxelles, 1992


Participant Artists: Judith Barry, Rossella Biscotti, Peggy Buth, Ayoh Kré Duchâtelet, Jean Katambayi, Johan Lagae & Paoletta Holst, Chrystel Mukeba, Daniela Ortiz, Ruth Sacks, Traumnovelle Curated by: Sammy Baloji, Silvia Franceschini, Nikolaus Hirsch, Estelle Lecaille


Comments


bottom of page